(English) Tracking Fish in the Rideau Canal Waterway

Figure 2: PhD student Jordanna Bergman surgically implanting an acoustic transmitter into a northern pike in a waterfilled and padded trough. Photo by Dan Rubinstein.

Désolé, cet article est seulement disponible en Anglais Canadien.

By Jordanna N. Bergman, PhD Student, Carleton University and Steven J. Cooke, Professor, Carleton University

Background

The Rideau Canal Waterway is a 202­ km route of picturesque lakes, rivers, and artificial canals connected by 23 active lockstations and 45 locks. Originally constructed in the mid 1800s to facilitate commercial and military transport between Lake Ontario and the Ottawa River, today the Rideau Canal is almost entirely operated to support recreational, cultural, and economic activities. In fact, the system is so iconic and unique that it received World Heritage Site designation from the United Nations. Managed by Parks Canada, the lock system is used by recreational boaters, canoeists, and kayakers during the navigation season (mid-May to mid­-October) to travel throughout the waterway. With pristine aquatic habitats and one of the most diverse fish communities in Canada, the Rideau Canal is home to first­class fishing and supports an important tourism­based industry for eastern Ontario. Trophy gamefish can be found in the waterway, including Largemouth and Smallmouth Bass (Micropterus salmoides and M. dolomieu), Muskellunge (Esox masquinongy), and northern pike (Esox lucius).

Figure 1: A black crappie externally marked with an anchor tag (circled in red). Photo by Jordanna N. Bergman.
Figure 1: A black crappie externally marked with an anchor tag (circled in red). Photo by Jordanna N. Bergman.

Have you ever wondered what else might be passing through locks with you beneath the surface? There’s a chance as you travel through a lockstation, fish are travelling right alongside you. Although lockmasters, anglers, and boaters have reported seeing fish inside locks, little is known about fish movement and behaviour related to lock­-and-­dam infrastructure. Do fish purposefully move through locks, or is it accidental? If they do move through locks, to what extent?

Are movements species­-specific and/or seasonally driven? Students in the Fish Ecology and Conservation Physiology Lab at Carleton University are using acoustic telemetry equipment and generous help from anglers to investigate fish movements and the ecological connectivity of the Rideau Canal Waterway.

Figure 2: PhD student Jordanna Bergman surgically implanting an acoustic transmitter into a northern pike in a waterfilled and padded trough. Photo by Dan Rubinstein.
Figure 2: PhD student Jordanna Bergman surgically implanting an acoustic transmitter into a northern pike in a waterfilled and padded trough. Photo by Dan Rubinstein.

Biotelemetry, the tracking of animals using electronic tags, provides information on movement patterns of wild fish necessary to conservation and management efforts. Acoustic transmitters (i.e. tags) are surgically implanted into focal fish species and emit an underwater sound signal that sends unique identification information about that specific fish to acoustic receivers. Receivers, which are strategically placed beneath the water surface throughout the waterway prior to tagging, receive the sound signals and convert them to digital data that can be used to determine tag positions.

In the summer of 2019, we acoustically tagged 245 fish; these include two gamefish species, largemouth bass and northern pike, and two invasive species, common carp (Cyprinus carpio) and round goby (Neogobius melanostomus) Additional efforts and experimental projects were focused on northern pike given that they are known to travel relatively long distances (up to 8­km daily). The team deployed 90 acoustic receivers throughout the waterway in the spring and in November they will be braving the cold to retrieve them to download data and analyze fish movement patterns.

Another interesting aspect of our acoustic telemetry research involves the inclusion of invasive species. We acoustically tagged both common carp and the recently discovered round goby this past summer. Round Goby are of special concern as they are a newly introduced invasive species to the Rideau Canal. We are hopeful that we may be able to prevent their further spread by understanding, and exploiting, their spatial ecology (when and where a species distributes themselves over time to reside, avoid predation, forage, and for sexually mature individuals, reproduce). Round Goby were first documented in the canal during a scheduled water drawdown in Edmonds Lockstation in Smiths Falls in 2018. The round goby is a small (25­cm max), highly aggressive, bottomdwellingfish that has been observed to predate on the eggs and young of nesting gamefish, appears to contribute to increased incidences of avian botulism, and as a result of competitive exclusion, often displaces native species to suboptimal habitat. Although our team struggled to capture round goby for weeks (a bittersweet sign, as we interpret this to mean population densities are still low) we finally identified a successful capture method using a backpack electrofishing unit. We implanted acoustic tags into 45 Round Goby. Upon retrieval of our acoustic receivers in November, round goby movements will be at the top of the list for analysis.

In addition to the aforementioned electronic tagging studies, we are also conducting an extensive external tagging study to investigate broadscale fish movements in the Rideau Canal. We are striving to tag and release 10,000 fish with external identification tags, also known as anchor tags. Besides a unique ID number, the tag also has contact information (email: carleton.tag@gmail.com and phone number: (613) 520-­2600 x4377) for anglers to report their catches. By partnering with anglers who report their catches of tagged fish, we can compare the original location the fish was tagged to the recapture location, and importantly, determine if that fish passed through any barriers (e.g. locks, dams) to adjacent water bodies. To date, we have tagged approximately 4,500 fish and will continue to tag fish until we reach our goal. Tagged fish species include Black Crappie (Pomoxis nigromaculatus), Bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus), Bullhead (Ictalurus spp.), Largemouth and Smallmouth Bass, Northern Pike, Pumpkinseed (Lepomis gibbosus), Rock Bass (Ambloplites rupestris), Yellow Perch (Perca flavescens), Walleye (Stizostedium vitreum), Lake Trout (Salvelinus namaycush), White Sucker (Catastomus commersoni), Common Carp (Cyprinus carpio), and Muskellunge. To date, 171 fish have been recaptured as of October 2019, none of which were recaptured in canal reaches other than where they were initially tagged.

Figure 3: Dr. Cooke's students ready to externally tag incoming bass at a Bass Anglers Association tournament. LR: Auston Chhor, Alexandria Trahan, Brenna Gagliardi.
Figure 3: Dr. Cooke’s students ready to externally tag incoming bass at a Bass Anglers Association tournament. LR: Auston Chhor, Alexandria Trahan, Brenna Gagliardi.

Over the next three years our team will continue working towards meeting the objective of tagging 10,000 fish and acoustically tagging a variety of fish species. By analyzing acoustic telemetry data in conjunction with angler­recapture data, we hope to better understand fish connectivity in the Rideau Canal Waterway and use that information to support economically important gamefish and simultaneously minimize invasive species impacts. If you are curious to learn more about our research, or see a video of how fish are tagged, you can check out our Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/Cook eFECPL/ or visit our lab website at http://www.fecpl.ca/

(English) Evaluating Whether Carbonated Beverages Reduce Bleeding and Improve Survival of Esocids with Gill Injuries

Image 2. Comparing gill colour of a northern pike against a standardized scale.

Désolé, cet article est seulement disponible en Anglais Canadien.

By Alexandria Trahan1, John Anderson1, Andy J. Danylchuk3 and Steven J. Cooke1

1 Fish Ecology and Conservation Physiology Laboratory, Department of Biology and Institute of Environmental and Interdisciplinary Science, Carleton University, Ottawa, ON, K1S 5B6, Canada

2 The Ottawa River Musky Factory, John Anderson, The Ottawa River Musky Factory 106 County Road 9, Plantagenet, Ontario, Canada, K0B 1L0, Canada.

3 Department of Environmental Conservation, University of Massachusetts Amherst, 160 Holdsworth Way, Amherst, MA, 01003, USA

Autumn skies are upon us and musky are in a flurry to fatten up before winter hits. As you enjoy the time on the water with a stick bait trailing behind the boat, SLAM….your heart is now pounding as you fight that prized Muskie and successfully get it to the boat. Upon landing you notice that one of the gills was nicked by a hook, and the water around the fish is stained with blood. All you can think is, now what? Will the fish survive or is there a way to stop the bleeding? You then recall seeing a video online that went viral not long, showing Mountain Dew being poured over the gills of a bass to stop bleeding. As you look to your cooler for something even close to Mountain Dew, you then also remember the discussion and debate online by anglers, writers and scientists, with some arguing that this is indeed an approach that should be embraced, while others urging caution since no scientific study has been done yet evaluating whether carbonated beverages control bleeding and improve the survival of injured fish. With no resolve, you do the best you can with this particular musky, and end your day hoping that this debate would soon be effectively put to rest.

This is where we come in. For the past few months we have been systematically testing whether a bleeding fish should have a carbonated beverage poured over bleeding gills following capture on hook and line. Although we had hoped to work on Muskies, given their rarity and size, we selected its sister species – northern pike – for the research. Given that we test this on live fish, we first needed to demonstrate that our science had valid purpose, and that our proposed procedures were in line with criteria laid out by the Canadian Council on Animal Care. Specific to our study design was experimentally injuring gills of fish by cutting out a standardized portion of gill filaments from a gill arch (see Image 1), and then pouring a selection of carbonated liquids over the gills to see if the bleeding stopped and for how long (details below).

Image 1: Piece of a gill removed from a northern pike.
Image 1: Piece of a gill removed from a northern pike.

What helped us get approval was that our research would resolve the frantic online debate, as well as provide evidence as to whether pouring carbonated beverages over bleeding gills would improve the outcome for an injured fish if it had to be released.

With a scientific collection permit in hand from the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry, it was time to start with the systematic and controlled evaluation of this longstanding questions. As with any systematic, scientific study, we had to consider and control for as many factors as possible, including water temperature, the size of the fish, and the type, amount, and temperature of carbonated beverage to be poured on the fish’s gills. Given that water temperature has a dramatic effect on the biology of fish, we opted to focus on late spring conditions when water temperature was between 11­-18 C, and late summer when the temperature was 24­-27 C. To then determine what type of carbonated beverage to use, we explored the different social media platforms that revealed the most common beverage being used by anglers on fish – that being Mountain Dew and Coca Cola. We also used plain carbonated lake water as a third liquid to be poured over bleeding gills, allowing us to test whether the additives in the soft drinks made a difference or it was just carbonation. For additional scientific rigor, we included two additional groups ­ one ‘reference’ group where the fish’s gills were cut but nothing was poured on the wound, and the other being a ‘baseline’ group where nothing was done to the fish (it was simply held in a cooler for the same sampling period as the other fish).

For the experiment, fish were angled, landed, and placed into a trough filled with lake water. Fish were then measured and had their gill colour compared to a standardized scale (see Image 2), prior to being selected for one of the five groups mentioned above. Gill colour was recorded because it is relative to the amount of blood loss, with gills full of blood (most common) being bright red, and gills with lower and lower blood flow progressively lighter and lighter, to almost becoming white if fish bleed out.

Image 2. Comparing gill colour of a northern pike against a standardized scale.
Image 2. Comparing gill colour of a northern pike against a standardized scale.

For groups where gill tissue was removed, fish were individually placed in a cooler, and evaluated for relative bleeding intensity and the time it took for bleeding to stop. Relative bleeding intensity was based on the following scale: 0, no bleeding; 1, little bleeding, hard to see; 2, obviously bleeding, easy to see; and 3, intense bleeding, pulsatile blood flow. For the ‘popped’ or carbonated lake water groups, we recorded bleeding intensity immediately before and after a set volume of liquid poured directly onto the wounded gills. This would help us evaluate claims online suggesting that carbonated beverages reduced the amount of the blood loss. For all fish, additional bleeding values were recorded at range of intervals during a 20­-minute holding period. After 20 minutes of holding the vigour and condition of the fish was recorded, and fish that were not moribund were released. To test whether the temperature of the pop makes a difference, we repeated the above series of experiments comparing how bleeding is affected by Mountain Dew at both 4 C (as if the pop just came out of an ice­filled cooler) to 2 C (as if the pop had been sitting in a can in a koozie on the console of the boat for a few hours). We stuck to Mountain Dew for this experiment since it was the most common beverage being used in the videos online.

For both experiments combined we caught and evaluated over 200 northern pike. We are still analyzing the data to determine whether the different carbonated beverage treatments had an effect on bleeding. Stay tuned for more details and whether you are best to keep the carbonated beverages for yourself or to share them with your fish.

(English) International study shows muskies on the move

Jan-Michael Hessenauer, Ph.D. Fisheries Research Biologist Lake St. Clair Fisheries Research Station Michigan Department of Natural Resources. Hessenauer is seen with a muskie captured as part of the Michigan DNR trawl survey in Lake St. Clair in August 2016. COURTESY OF JAN-MICHAEL HESSENAUER / WINDSOR STAR

Désolé, cet article est seulement disponible en Anglais Canadien.

A roaming muskie dubbed James Bond is helping scientists spy on muskies that are so difficult to catch, they’re called the fish of 10,000 casts.

Researchers have tracked a muskie with 007 in its identifying records from the Detroit River to the far end of Lake Erie near Buffalo to Lake St. Clair and back to Lake Erie.

That is the most well-travelled muskellunge in an international study that is tracking 111 muskies with surgically implanted transmitters to understand what these large predator fish with a mouthful of teeth are doing.

Read more in the Windsor Star…

(English) The Lake Simcoe Muskie Restoration Project

Désolé, cet article est seulement disponible en Anglais Canadien.

Young muskie during stocking at Orillia and Cook’s Bay
Young muskie during stocking at Orillia and Cook’s Bay

By Ian Young, Jim Kelly, and Dave Boxall

2018 marked the 14th year of the Lake Simcoe Muskie Restoration Program (LSMRP). The epitome of a true partnership, the LSMRP involves Muskies Canada, Orillia Fish and Game, Fleming College, the Becker Foundation, OFAH, Toronto Spring Fishing and Boat Show and MNRF’s Aurora and Midhurst Districts. This program aims to restore a self-sustaining Muskie population that is not reliant on stocking back into Lake Simcoe. Once plentiful in the lake, it is believed that by the 1930’s the species was almost extirpated due to a variety of reasons, including a prior commercial fishery, decreased spawning habitat quality increasing Pike numbers and a lack of catch and release ethic by anglers.

A Feasibility study conducted prior to the program’s start in 2005, determined that restoring Muskie was feasible, but likely wouldn’t be successful if the original or Kawartha strain Muskie was used to help restock the lake. Kawartha’s Muskie have proven to have little tolerance for, nor an ability to co-exist with Northern Pike whereas their cousins to the north in Georgian Bay, have long been able to co-exist. Therefore, all partners agreed that Georgian Bay strain Muskie would be used.

Since 2005, crews trap netted Muskie every spring in either Georgian Bay or nearby Gloucester Pool (considered same strain) hoping to collect as many as three families each year. But like all good things … it wasn’t easy! “If Muskie are known as the fish of 10,000 casts amongst us anglers, then they are quietly recognized as the fish of a thousand net sets for fisheries techs and biologists,” revealed long time Muskies Canada member, trap netting volunteer and LSMRP organizer Jim Kelly. “Some years we would capture several ripe male and female muskies and collect our full three families in less than two weeks while other years MNRF staff would have their nets out and check for 4 or 5 weeks and barely scrape out enough ripe Muskie for one family,” he added. Whatever the case however one thing was certain … that once the fertilized eggs were transferred over to Mark Newell – “The Muskie Whisperer” and Hatchery Manager at Sir Sandford Fleming College in Lindsay, he would work his magic and get the absolute most out of every single egg, fry and fingerling he was tasked with raising!

Over the years the actual number of Muskie stocked into Lake Simcoe has varied tremendously … from less than a hundred at the start to as many as 4,000 in 2015.

After more than 10 years of trapnetting Muskie in Gloucester Pool, crews from Midhurst and Aurora realized that fewer and fewer Muskie were being caught there so they decided instead in 2018 to join forces with their MNRF Upper Great Lakes Management Unit (UGLMU) cohorts to help trap net Muskie in Severn Sound of Georgian Bay. Here they trap netted for over three weeks in early May and although several Muskie were captured … not all were ripe and willing to yield the eggs and milt required. One very large family however was collected from a big female with plenty of eggs and in the end, this proved to be the saving grace for 2018. “Mark was able to work his magic once again and get the absolute optimal results from that one family … enough that by early summer he was able to transfer 450 summer fingerlings to MNRF’s Harwood Fish Culture Station,” said Dave Boxall long time Muskie Canada member LSMRP organizer. Here, just like Mark was able to do at Fleming, staff did an amazing job ensuring cannibalism was kept at a minimum and only a small handful of mortalities were the result. So … by November stocking time about 1,700 fall fingerlings from Fleming were ready to be stocked into Lake Simcoe and 400 from Harwood were prepared for Georgian Bay at Severn Sound. “The major preparation procedure is basically switching all of the Muskie over from a pellet based feed – over to minnows. This helps acclimate all those individuals to the type of food source they’ll need to chase down and capture in their new homes if they want to survive” concluded Dave.

It was agreed beforehand that a portion of the total stocking numbers in 2018 should go back into the waterbody where the parents came from. On November 15, a crew from MNRF Aurora District, the UGLMU and Harwood Fish Culture, braved icy and snowy conditions to travel out on Georgian Bay in their Jon Boat to release 397 Muskie. “As Wil Wegman, with MNRF Aurora District who’s been connected with the LSMRP mentioned on his Instagram and Facebook Page, many of those young Muskie were stocked around the exact same area of Severn Sound where their parents were captured in trap nets that very spring and where that very important egg collection was conducted,” said Ian.

Stocking Muskie back into Lake Simcoe occurred successfully as well. On November 3rd, over 35 volunteers from Orillia Fish and Game, Muskies Canada, Bayshore Village Community, Fleming College and the Aurora Bassmasters … converged on Barnstable Bay in Lake Simcoe, and released 500 healthy young fingerlings between 7-9 inches from Fleming. On November 6th, Fleming students travelled by boat to the south side of Georgina Island and released 587 Muskie between there and the mainland. The Talbot River was the final stop for Muskie stocking in 2018 and for at least a year while the stocking portion of the LSMRP takes a one-year hiatus in 2019. Those 589 fall fingerlings and four larger yearlings were stocked throughout the river in prime habitat with more shiners to feed on than they could eat in a lifetime.

Ian Young is past president of MCI and lead for the LSMRP for his organization. “So after stocking over 20,000 Muskie into Lake Simcoe since 2005, it looks like, at Press Time anyways, that LSMRP will be taking at least a year off from capturing Muskie in the spring for egg collections and from raising Muskie at the hatcheries and releasing fall fingerlings in November”. There are several reasons for this hiatus, including current spending and travel restrictions on MNRF District staff since the new government came into power here in Ontario,

“After 14 years we are nearing the end of the project and it is now timely to sit back and re-evaluate where the program should go from here. Without trap netting and stocking, in 2019 and beyond, I know MNRF staff would like to focus more on monitoring Lake Simcoe and it’s rivers to try and determine how successful the program has been and where all those stocked Muskie and their offspring can be found. So here at Muskies Canada, we are on board with that in a big way and we look forward to an ongoing partnership with the fine staff at MNRF. We have made some great working relationships and personal friendships with these dedicated Muskie enthusiasts and we know that won’t end anytime soon,” concluded Ian.

Génétique des populations de maskinongés du fleuve Saint-Laurent, de ses principaux affluents et des lacs du Québec

Quentin Rougemont1, Anne Carrier2, Jeremy Le-luyer3, Anne-Laure Ferchaud1, John M. Farrell4, Daniel Hatin5, Philippe Brodeur6, Louis Bernatchez1

1Département de biologie, Institut de biologie intégrative et des systèmes (IBIS), Université Laval, G1V 0A6, Québec, Canada
2Département de techniques du milieu naturel, Centre d’études collégiales à Chibougamau, Cégep de Saint-Félicien, Chibougamau, G8P 2E9, Canada
3IFREMER, Unité Ressources Marines en Polynésie, Centre Océanologique du Pacifique – Vairao – BP 49 – 98179 Taravao – Tahiti – Polynésie Française
4Department of Environmental and Forest Biology, State University of New York, College of Environmental Science and Forestry, 13210, Syracuse, New York, USA.
5Ministère des Forêts, de la Faune et des Parcs, Direction de la gestion de la faune de l’Estrie-Montréal-Montérégie-Laval, 201, Place Charles-Le Moyne, Longueuil, Québec, J4K 2T5, Canada
6Ministère des Forêts, de la Faune et des Parcs, Direction de la gestion de la faune de la Mauricie et du Centre-du-Québec, 100, rue Laviolette, bureau 207, Trois-Rivières, Québec, G9A 5S9, Canada

Introduction

Un grand nombre d’espèces de poissons ont vu leur abondance diminuer en raison notamment des activités humaines, qui peuvent entraîner une entrave au passage des poissons, de la pollution, des pertes d’habitats, de la surexploitation et bien d’autres problématiques. En réaction à ces baisses d’abondance, de nombreux programmes d’ensemencement ont été déployés pour soutenir les populations, dont celles de maskinongés (Esox masquinongy) du Québec. Cette espèce, réputée pour la pêche sportive de gros spécimens, a connu une baisse d’abondance considérable au cours de la première moitié du 20e siècle dans les eaux du fleuve Saint-Laurent et de l’archipel de Montréal. De 1950 à 1997, des maskinongés provenant de plans d’eau ontariens et américains ont été utilisés pour l’ensemencement de plus de 1,5 million d’individus. Ainsi, de 1950 à 1965, des œufs de maskinongé ont été initialement prélevés dans le lac Chautauqua, dans l’État de New York (USA), pour être transférés à la pisciculture de Lachine au Québec, où les alevins ont été élevés avant d’être relâchés dans le fleuve, ses tributaires et certains lacs. De 1965 à 1986, des adultes du lac Joseph ont été utilisés comme source pour les ensemencements. Enfin, de 1986 à 1997, des œufs provenant de la population du lac Tremblant ont été utilisés. Les populations des lacs Joseph et Tremblant sont issus eux-mêmes d’ensemencements à partir du lac Chautauqua (voir l’article de Carrier et collaborateurs  pour obtenir plus de détails sur l’historique des ensemencements).

La gestion optimale du maskinongé passe nécessairement par la délimitation génétique des populations et l’évaluation du degré d’isolement entre elles. L’existence de populations plus ou moins isolées et indépendantes du point de vue de la reproduction doit effectivement être considérée dans les scénarios de conservation et de gestion. De plus, des groupes de poissons génétiquement distincts peuvent développer des adaptations locales si l’environnement diffère, adaptations leur permettant d’optimiser leur reproduction et leur survie dans un type d’habitat donné. Il est donc essentiel de conserver la variation génétique naturelle ancestrale d’une espèce et de s’assurer qu’elle préserve un bagage génétique assez diversifié pour lui permettre de s’adapter aux changements de son environnement. Ces connaissances permettront de définir les unités de gestion de la pêche et de protection et de restauration des habitats. Cela est particulièrement important dans le cas de systèmes ouverts comme le fleuve Saint-Laurent et ses tributaires.

La structure et la diversité génétique des populations de maskinongés n’avaient jamais été étudiées dans le fleuve Saint-Laurent, ses principaux affluents et les lacs des eaux intérieures du Québec. Une étude a donc été réalisée pour : 1) mesurer la structure génétique des populations de maskinongés, 2) mesurer l’effet des ensemencements historiques sur la diversité et la structure génétique des populations et 3) définir les unités territoriales de gestion des populations afin de maintenir une ressource durable pour la pêche.

Échantillonnage et caractérisation génétique

Un total de 662 maskinongés ont été échantillonnés dans 22 sites, pour un nombre approximatif de 24 poissons par site (Figure 1). Ces échantillons ont été principalement obtenus grâce à la précieuse collaboration de guides de pêche professionnels (M. Marc Thorpe, M. Mike Lazarus et M. Michael Philips), de leurs clients-pêcheurs, de pêcheurs sportifs bénévoles et du travail des techniciens de la faune. Un petit prélèvement de tissus de nageoire pelvienne (1 cm²; 100 mg), ensuite préservé dans l’éthanol, a été suffisant pour procéder aux analyses au laboratoire de L. Bernatchez à l’Université Laval. Les poissons ont été remis à l’eau à la suite de la capture.

L’échantillonnage a permis de couvrir les tronçons du fleuve Saint-Laurent distribués entre la région des Mille-Îles et le lac Saint-Pierre, les principaux tributaires du fleuve et certains lacs des eaux intérieures du Québec. Les sources majeures ayant été utilisées pour les ensemencements ont aussi été échantillonnées : 1) les lacs Chautauqua (État de New York) et Pigeon (Ontario), 2) le lac Joseph et 3) le lac Tremblant. Ces deux derniers plans d’eau ont eux-mêmes été ensemencés pour y introduire le maskinongé et ont ensuite été utilisés comme source de géniteurs quelques années plus tard. Le lac Traverse, situé en Mauricie, a également été inclus parmi les plans d’eau étudiés puisqu’il s’agit d’un des rares lacs à maskinongé n’ayant jamais été ensemencé.

En laboratoire, l’ADN de chaque maskinongé a été extrait à partir des petits échantillons de nageoires puis cet ADN a été caractérisé à l’aide d’une technologie de pointe qui permet de lire chacune des variations d’ADN sur une grande portion du génome (génotypage par séquençage). Grâce à cette méthode d’analyse, il a été possible d’identifier un très grand nombre de variations génétiques (polymorphisme nucléotidique simple ou SNP), qui ont pu être comparées d’un individu à l’autre et entre les différents sites échantillonnés. Les mesures de diversité et de structure génétique ont pris en compte plus de 16 000 positions différentes sur les brins d’ADN de chacun des maskinongés analysés.

Figure 1 - Localisation des sites d’échantillonnage.
Figure 1 – Localisation des sites d’échantillonnage.

Structure génétique des populations

Les analyses de diversité génétique ont révélé un niveau modéré de diversité en comparaison avec d’autres espèces de poissons qui ont été étudiées avec des méthodes semblables. La taille efficace des populations, estimée à partir des outils génétiques, correspond au nombre de géniteurs se reproduisant efficacement, transmettant ainsi leur bagage génétique à leur progéniture. En général, le nombre total de poissons compris dans une population peut être de 10 à 100 fois plus élevé que le nombre d’individus efficaces. La taille efficace des populations s’est en général avérée relativement faible, en particulier dans les lacs isolés. Pour le fleuve Saint-Laurent, la taille efficace a été estimée à 669 individus pour l’ensemble des sites regroupés. Cette valeur est considérée comme modérée comparativement à ce qui est observé chez d’autres espèces, mais reflète les caractéristiques particulières du cycle de vie du maskinongé (longévité élevée, position supérieure dans la chaîne alimentaire, comportement solitaire et territorial) et sa densité de population typiquement faible. Ces constats soulignent la vulnérabilité de cette espèce et l’importance d’appliquer des mesures de protection particulières pour en assurer la pérennité.

Les mesures de différenciation et de structure génétique suggèrent l’existence de huit groupes génétiquement distincts dans le système à l’étude. Le premier groupe comprend les maskinongés utilisés comme source d’ensemencement et les sites directement dérivés de ceux-ci, c’est-à-dire les lacs Chautauqua, Joseph, Tremblant, Frontière et Maskinongé ainsi que les rivières Chaudière et Saint-Maurice. Cela confirme l’origine commune des maskinongés de ces plans d’eau, tous dérivés de la source du lac Chautauqua, situé dans l’État de New York. Pour les rivières Chaudière et Saint-Maurice, nos résultats suggèrent que le maskinongé y était faiblement représenté initialement et que les ensemencements auraient permis l’établissement de populations pérennes. Le second groupe correspond à la rivière de l’Achigan et le troisième groupe à la rivière Yamaska, qui se distinguent du fleuve Saint-Laurent. Le quatrième groupe se compose de l’ensemble des sites du Saint-Laurent depuis les Mille-Îles jusqu’au lac Saint-Pierre. Le cinquième groupe correspond au lac des Deux-Montagnes, qui s’est avéré génétiquement distinct des maskinongés du fleuve Saint-Laurent. Fait à noter, les maskinongés du lac des Deux-Montagnes montrent, dans une certaine proportion, des migrations vers le lac Saint-Louis. Ces individus migrateurs ont en majorité (83%) été retrouvés sur la rive nord du lac Saint-Louis, qui est alimenté par les eaux provenant de la rivière des Outaouais. Le sixième groupe est composé des lacs isolés n’ayant fait l’objet d’aucun ensemencement, représenté dans la présente étude par le lac Traverse. Ce plan d’eau présente une structure génétique unique qu’il convient de préserver. Le septième groupe correspond au lac Pigeon (qui fait partie du système des lacs Kawartha en Ontario), ayant servi aux ensemencements dans une moindre mesure que les autres plans d’eau, et enfin le huitième groupe correspond au lac Champlain.

Dans le fleuve Saint-Laurent, bien qu’il s’agisse d’une seule population, plus la distance géographique entre les lieux de capture de deux individus est grande, plus la différenciation génétique entre eux est importante. Ce patron est une conséquence de la dispersion géographiquement réduite des individus à l’échelle de l’ensemble du Saint-Laurent. De plus, la variation génétique observée dans le fleuve Saint-Laurent est continue, c’est-à-dire qu’il n’y existe pas de réels groupes génétiques fortement différenciés. Cela suggère que la dispersion peut se faire librement de l’amont vers l’aval bien qu’elle soit évidemment réduite vers l’amont par la présence de deux obstacles majeurs sur le Saint-Laurent, soit les barrages Beauharnois et Moses-Saunders.

Figure 2 - Histogramme présentant le pourcentage d’appartenance de chaque individu aux différents groupes génétiques. Chaque barre verticale correspond à un individu échantillonné dans un plan d’eau et représente son degré d’appartenance (ou de mélange) à un groupe donné. Chaque couleur représente un groupe génétiquement distinct. À titre d’exemple, on remarque la très grande similitude génétique entre les individus des lacs Frontière, Joseph et Tremblant (FRO, JOS et TRE respectivement), qui ont tous été ensemencés à partir de la source du lac Chautauqua (CHQ). Inversement, on remarque la grande différence génétique entre les maskinongés du lac Traverse (TRA) et ceux de tous les autres plans d’eau. Points orange : source d’individus utilisés pour les ensemencements. Points verts : lacs et rivières où le maskinongé était absent ou peu abondant avant les ensemencements. Points bleus : tronçons du fleuve Saint-Laurent et lac des Deux-Montagnes. Pour la signification des abréviations, voir la Figure 1.
Figure 2 – Histogramme présentant le pourcentage d’appartenance de chaque individu aux différents groupes génétiques. Chaque barre verticale correspond à un individu échantillonné dans un plan d’eau et représente son degré d’appartenance (ou de mélange) à un groupe donné. Chaque couleur représente un groupe génétiquement distinct. À titre d’exemple, on remarque la très grande similitude génétique entre les individus des lacs Frontière, Joseph et Tremblant (FRO, JOS et TRE respectivement), qui ont tous été ensemencés à partir de la source du lac Chautauqua (CHQ). Inversement, on remarque la grande différence génétique entre les maskinongés du lac Traverse (TRA) et ceux de tous les autres plans d’eau. Points orange : source d’individus utilisés pour les ensemencements. Points verts : lacs et rivières où le maskinongé était absent ou peu abondant avant les ensemencements. Points bleus : tronçons du fleuve Saint-Laurent et lac des Deux-Montagnes. Pour la signification des abréviations, voir la Figure 1.

Effet des ensemencements

L’analyse fine des patrons de mélange génétique permet d’estimer l’effet des ensemencements sur la structure génétique des populations (Figure 2). Cette analyse a révélé que les ensemencements n’ont eu que très peu d’effets sur l’intégrité génétique des populations sauvages dans le fleuve Saint-Laurent. On y a mesuré peu de mélanges génétiques impliquant les souches des lacs Chautauqua, Joseph ou Tremblant, utilisés comme populations sources. À l’inverse, on observe des évidences de mélange génétique dans certains affluents du Saint-Laurent, et ce, malgré le fait qu’ils aient, dans la plupart des cas, reçu des quantités plus faibles de poissons ensemencés que le fleuve. C’est le cas pour les rivières Saint-Maurice et Chaudière ainsi que pour le lac Maskinongé où l’on constate un mélange des bagages génétiques local (représenté en noir – Figure 2) et introduit (représenté en vert – Figure 2). L’hypothèse principale susceptible d’expliquer ce patron est que les ensemencements ont eu des effets variables en fonction de la taille initiale des populations. En règle générale, on s’attend à ce que l’ensemencement par des individus issus de groupes génétiques différents, dans le cas présent des individus de lacs éloignés (différences climatiques et de types d’habitats), soit potentiellement inefficace en raison du manque d’adaptation des individus ensemencés aux conditions locales. Il est donc possible que les individus ensemencés dans le Saint-Laurent aient eu un faible succès reproducteur et/ou que les hybrides issus de la reproduction aient été peu adaptés aux conditions locales, montrant ultimement un faible taux de survie. Ainsi, il est possible que les maskinongés non indigènes aient été supplantés dans le fleuve Saint-Laurent, qui possédait potentiellement une plus grande taille de population que les lacs isolés ou les tributaires.

Incidences sur la gestion

Nos résultats indiquent que, d’un point de vue génétique, l’ensemble du fleuve Saint-Laurent, depuis la région des Mille-Îles jusqu’au lac Saint-Pierre, peut être considéré comme une seule entité au sein de laquelle la différenciation génétique des individus augmente faiblement en fonction de la distance qui les sépare. Ainsi, une seule unité de gestion serait suffisante sur le Saint-Laurent pour assurer le maintien de la diversité génétique dans ce système. Bien entendu, les populations qui sont isolées par des obstacles infranchissables devraient toutefois être gérées localement. C’est notamment le cas du lac Saint-François, enclavé par des barrages en amont (Moses-Saunders) et en aval (Beauharnois). La seconde unité de gestion comprend le lac des Deux-Montagnes, qui se distingue nettement de la population du fleuve Saint-Laurent. Le troisième groupe est constitué des affluents du fleuve Saint-Laurent, chacun représentant une unité distincte. Des nuances doivent toutefois être apportées en fonction de l’abondante du maskinongé à l’état naturel. Ainsi, les rivières de l’Achigan et Yamaska ne portent que peu de traces d’hybridation avec des poissons ensemencés alors que les rivières Chaudière et Saint-Maurice ont un profil de mélange génétique plus prononcé avec les sources d’ensemencement. Le quatrième groupe se compose des lacs ensemencés directement à partir du lac Chautauqua (lacs Joseph, Tremblant et Frontière) et partagent une similarité génétique forte avec ce dernier. Le cinquième groupe comprend les lacs dans lesquels le maskinongé était initialement présent (lacs Maskinongé et Champlain) et qui présentent des traces de mélange relativement modestes. Enfin, le lac Traverse représente l’une des rares, sinon la seule population naturelle non ensemencée au Québec et qui présente une composition génétique unique.

En conclusion, dans les systèmes précédemment non occupés par le maskinongé ou avec une très faible densité d’individus, les ensemencements ont permis le maintien à long terme des populations locales et ont ainsi contribué à mettre en valeur les activités de pêche sportive. Bien que les ensemencements aient temporairement contribué au recrutement de l’espèce et au maintien de l’offre de pêche dans la portion du fleuve Saint-Laurent situé dans la région de Montréal (voir l’article de Carrier et collaborateurs dans le présent numéro), ils ne semblent pas avoir été fructueux à long terme, possiblement en raison de la mauvaise adaptation des individus ensemencés aux conditions particulières d’un grand fleuve comme le Saint-Laurent. Lors d’une prochaine sortie de pêche, par exemple sur le fleuve Saint-Laurent ou le lac des Deux-Montagnes, il sera possible d’affirmer pêcher vraisemblablement des poissons indigènes d’origine locale. Nous recommandons d’éviter les ensemencements futurs sans une connaissance détaillée de l’abondance des stocks, de leur diversité et de la structure génétique ainsi que des échanges entre elles. La priorité devrait être accordée aux actions visant la protection et la restauration écologique des milieux aquatiques afin de permettre d’optimiser le succès de la reproduction naturelle.

Remerciements

Nous tenons à souligner l’implication des pêcheurs de maskinongés du Québec qui ont participé à la collecte d’échantillons, notamment celle de MM. Marc Thorpe, Mike Lazarus et Michael Phillips. Nous remercions M. Christopher Legard (New York State Department of Environmental Conservation) pour l’échantillonnage de spécimens du lac Chautauqua, M. Samuel Cartier pour le lac Champlain et M. Chris Wilson (Aquatic Research and Monitoring Section, Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry) pour le lac Pigeon. Merci à M. Christopher Wilson (Fish Culture Section, Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry) pour avoir partagé ses connaissances sur l’histoire des stations piscicoles et des ensemencements. Merci à M. Shawn Good (Vermont Fish & Wildlife Department) et à M. Jeffrey J. Loukmas (New York State Department of Environmental Conservation) pour avoir partagé leurs données sur l’historique de la gestion et des ensemencements au lac Champlain. Des remerciements particuliers vont également à M. Nicolas Auclair, M. Florent Archambault, M. Rémi Bacon, M. Christian Beaudoin, Mme Anabel Carrier, Mme Chantal Côté, Mme Julie Deschesnes, M. François Girard, M. Guillaume Lemieux, Mme Louise Nadon, M. Yves Paradis, Mme Geneviève Richard et Mme Éliane Valiquette pour leur contribution à la planification du projet et aux travaux de laboratoire et de terrain. Ce projet a été rendu possible grâce au financement du ministère des Forêts, de la Faune et des Parcs du Québec, de la Chaire de Recherche du Canada en Génomique et Conservation des Ressources aquatiques, de la Fondation héritage faune (Fédération québécoise des Chasseurs et pêcheurs), de Ressources Aquatiques Québec et de Muskies Inc.

Identification des habitats essentiels du maskinongé au lac Saint-Pierre

Photo : MFFP

Introduction

Le présent projet s’inscrit dans une démarche entreprise depuis 2010 par le ministère des Forêts, de la Faune et des Parcs (MFFP) du Québec et ses nombreux partenaires afin de mettre à jour les connaissances sur le maskinongé et d’en optimiser la gestion. Pour faire le point sur l’état actuel de la pêche au maskinongé dans le fleuve Saint-Laurent et dans le lac des Deux-Montagnes, un suivi des captures a été réalisé de 2010 à 2013, avec la collaboration de trois guides de pêche professionnels. Dans le tronçon du fleuve situé entre Montréal et Sorel ainsi qu’au lac Saint-Pierre, la plus faible abondance de jeunes spécimens récoltés par les pêcheurs sportifs suggère que le recrutement de jeunes maskinongés est plus faible dans ces deux plans d’eau, comparativement au lac Saint-Louis et au lac des Deux-Montagnes (voir Carrier et collaborateurs dans le présent numéro pour obtenir plus de détails).

Certaines activités anthropiques ont des répercussions négatives sur l’écosystème du Saint-Laurent. Elles se sont récemment traduites par une détérioration des habitats aquatiques, notamment au lac Saint-Pierre. Près de 5 000 ha d’habitats de reproduction, d’alevinage et de croissance des poissons dans la plaine d’inondation ont été modifiés en raison de l’intensification des pratiques agricoles, au cours des trois dernières décennies (de la Chenelière et coll. 2014). La disparition de vastes superficies d’herbiers aquatiques depuis le milieu des années 2000 (Figure 1; Magnan et coll. 2017) et la prolifération de cyanobactéries benthiques, qui se développent sur le fond du lac Saint-Pierre (Hudon et coll. 2012), ont également été documentées. Ces herbiers correspondent à des habitats de croissance et à des refuges pour plusieurs espèces de poissons. Cette situation soulève des questions fondamentales par rapport aux effets potentiels des pertes d’habitats sur les populations de grands prédateurs comme le maskinongé. De surcroît, les habitats essentiels de reproduction et de croissance des juvéniles du maskinongé n’ont jamais été identifiés au lac Saint-Pierre, ce qui limite notre capacité à bien orienter les efforts de protection et de restauration d’habitats visant spécifiquement cette espèce. Une étude a donc été mise sur pied pour suivre les déplacements de maskinongés adultes en période de reproduction et de croissance, pour déterminer les caractéristiques d’habitats sélectionnées par les poissons et pour localiser les zones de reproduction et de croissance des juvéniles.

Figure 1 - Abondance et distribution de la végétation aquatique submergée au lac Saint-Pierre, de 2002 à 2016 (tiré de Magnan et coll. 2017).
Figure 1 – Abondance et distribution de la végétation aquatique submergée au lac Saint-Pierre, de 2002 à 2016 (tiré de Magnan et coll. 2017).

Méthodologie

Figure 2 - Émetteur radio (photo du bas) et émetteur acoustique (photo du haut) utilisés pour le marquage des maskinongés. Photo : MFFP.
Figure 2 – Émetteur radio (photo du bas) et émetteur acoustique (photo du haut) utilisés pour le marquage des maskinongés. Photo : MFFP.

L’identification des patrons de déplacement et la localisation précise des maskinongés ont été rendues possibles grâce à l’utilisation des technologies de pointe en télémétrie. Deux types d’émetteurs ont été insérés dans l’abdomen des poissons : un émetteur acoustique, qui est détecté par des récepteurs fixes installés à des endroits stratégiques dans le fleuve Saint-Laurent et ses tributaires (Figure 2) et un émetteur radio muni d’une antenne externe visible sur la portion ventrale du poisson, ce qui permet une localisation précise des spécimens à l’aide d’un récepteur mobile, soit par survol aérien ou par bateau (Figure 3). Au printemps 2017 et au printemps 2018, un total d’environ 80 récepteurs fixes ont été déposés annuellement près du fond de l’eau entre Montréal et le secteur de Gentilly (Figure 4). Ces récepteurs, récupérés à la fin de chaque automne, enregistrent en continu le passage des poissons marqués. Le numéro de l’individu, la date et l’heure de passage sont ensuite extraits et utilisés à des fins d’analyse des déplacements.

Figure 3 - Récepteur radio mobile (photo de gauche) et récepteur acoustique fixe (photo de droite) utilisés pour la détection des maskinongés. Crédit : MFFP.
Figure 3 – Récepteur radio mobile (photo de gauche) et récepteur acoustique fixe (photo de droite) utilisés pour la détection des maskinongés. Crédit : MFFP.

Ces informations nous renseignent sur l’utilisation des habitats et le temps de résidence des maskinongés dans les différents tronçons du fleuve Saint-Laurent et de ses tributaires. Elles permettent également de définir les périodes et les patrons de migration saisonnière de l’espèce. De façon complémentaire, les localisations précises et en temps réel des poissons par télémétrie radio nous fournissent des renseignements sur la localisation et les caractéristiques des sites de rassemblement des adultes en période de reproduction printanière et durant la croissance estivale et automnale.

Figure 4 - Localisation des récepteurs acoustiques fixes ayant servi à mesurer le passage de maskinongés marqués au lac Saint-Pierre en 2018. Les stations installées entre Gentilly et Québec, soit à la droite de la présente carte n’ont pas été représentées.
Figure 4 – Localisation des récepteurs acoustiques fixes ayant servi à mesurer le passage de maskinongés marqués au lac Saint-Pierre en 2018. Les stations installées entre Gentilly et Québec, soit à la droite de la présente carte n’ont pas été représentées.

Résultats préliminaires

Un total de 21 maskinongés ont été capturés à la pêche sportive par les techniciens de la faune du MFFP et grâce à la précieuse collaboration de pêcheurs professionnels, M. Mike Lazarus et M. Marc Thorpe. Au moyen d’une chirurgie, les poissons ont été munis d’émetteurs au cours de l’automne 2016 et de l’automne 2017. La taille des spécimens, composés de mâles et de femelles adultes, variait de 38 à 52 pouces (Figure 5). Les travaux d’implantation des émetteurs menés par les techniciens de la faune du MFFP se sont très bien déroulés. Tous les maskinongés ont été repérés à au moins une occasion, soit 6 à 18 mois environ après avoir été marqués, ce qui indique que l’ensemble des individus ont survécu après la chirurgie.

Dix individus marqués à l’automne 2016 ont été suivis en bateau et par survol aérien entre le 25 avril et le 24 mai 2017. Au cours de cette période, qui inclut la migration vers les sites de reproduction et les activités de fraye, 112 localisations précises d’individus marqués ont été notées. L’habitat sélectionné par chaque individu a également été caractérisé (végétation, substrat, température, vitesse du courant, teneur en oxygène, profondeur, etc.). Les localisations enregistrées au printemps 2017 ont montré que l’ensemble des maskinongés marqués au lac Saint-Pierre au cours de l’automne précédent utilisaient le secteur du lac Saint-Pierre pour se reproduire. Les données ont révélé que 38 % des individus repérés par télémétrie radio ont utilisé des tributaires du lac Saint-Pierre en période de reproduction (avril-mai). Des spécimens ont été localisés dans les rivières du Loup, Saint-François, Nicolet ainsi que dans le chenal Tardif (branche de la rivière Saint-François). Après la reproduction, ces individus ont effectué une migration vers des habitats d’alimentation situés dans le fleuve Saint-Laurent. Le reste des individus ont utilisé des baies du lac Saint-Pierre en période de fraye. En période printanière, les maskinongés se trouvaient à des profondeurs variant de 0,6 à 8,2 m (moyenne : 3,1 m), dans des zones de faible vitesse du courant, en majorité sous 0,1 m/s. Dans la majorité des cas, les maskinongés se trouvaient dans des habitats qui présentaient une végétation submergée d’abondance modérée à élevée.

L’analyse des déplacements observés en 2017, basée sur les données enregistrées par plusieurs dizaines de récepteurs fixes, a montré qu’après la période de reproduction, la majorité des poissons marqués à l’automne 2016 au lac Saint-Pierre ont séjourné dans ce plan d’eau au cours de l’été et de l’automne 2017. Toutefois, en période d’alimentation et de croissance estivale, 60 % des individus ont effectué des migrations à grande échelle vers le tronçon du fleuve situé entre Montréal et Sorel, certains atteignant même les stations situées près du pont Jacques-Cartier, à Montréal.

Afin de suivre les déplacements des 21 individus marqués, les travaux de suivi télémétrique se poursuivront en 2018 et en 2019. L’ensemble des résultats recueillis au cours du présent projet permettra d’identifier et de cartographier les habitats préférentiels du maskinongé, notamment les sites de reproduction, qui pourront ensuite être protégés ou restaurés au besoin. Les résultats préliminaires de 2017 soulignent déjà le rôle des marais peu profonds du lac Saint-Pierre et de certains de ses tributaires pour la reproduction de l’espèce. Il sera important de valider ce constat au cours des prochaines années, d’estimer le rôle que jouent ces divers secteurs dans le recrutement de l’espèce et d’évaluer l’état de santé des habitats qu’on y trouve. De plus, les migrations sur de grandes distances rapportées en 2017 soulignent que la gestion du maskinongé et de ses habitats doit se faire minimalement à l’échelle de l’ensemble du tronçon fluvial étudié, incluant la portion en aval des tributaires. Ce constat est appuyé par les résultats de la structure génétique des populations du fleuve, qui ont démontré l’homogénéité du bagage génétique de la population de maskinongé dans le tronçon situé entre le lac Saint-Louis et le lac Saint-Pierre (voir Rougemont et collaborateurs dans le présent numéro pour les détails sur la génétique des populations).

Figure 5 - Distribution en taille des maskinongés marqués au lac Saint-Pierre.
Figure 5 – Distribution en taille des maskinongés marqués au lac Saint-Pierre.

Mise en garde aux pêcheurs

Si vous capturez un maskinongé marqué, vous devez le relâcher après avoir pris en note le numéro du poisson et le numéro de téléphone inscrits sur l’étiquette située à la base de la nageoire dorsale (il est souvent nécessaire de gratter la surface de l’étiquette pour bien voir les numéros qui y sont inscrits). Attention, il est primordial d’éviter de sortir le spécimen de l’eau et de limiter le temps de manipulation. D’ailleurs, ces conseils s’appliquent à l’ensemble des captures de maskinongés, qu’ils soient marqués ou non. Contactez ensuite un biologiste du MFFP au numéro inscrit sur l’étiquette externe afin de lui fournir la date, le lieu de capture et, si possible, des photos de la partie ventrale du poisson.

Remerciements

Nous tenons à remercier tous les partenaires qui ont participé au financement et à la réalisation des travaux de télémétrie. Un merci tout particulier aux pêcheurs professionnels, M. Mike Lazarus et M. Marc Thorpe, pour leur soutien lors du développement de l’étude et pour leur participation à la capture des spécimens. Merci également à M. Florent Archambault, M. Nicolas Auclair, M. Rémi Bacon, Mme Virginie Boivin, Mme Chantal Côté, M. Charles-Étienne Gagnon, M. Guillaume Lemieux, M. Yves Paradis et M. René Perreault pour leur soutien logistique et pour tous les efforts déployés sur le terrain. Le projet est rendu possible grâce à la collaboration et au soutien financier du ministère des Forêts, de la Faune et des Parcs, du Comité ZIP du lac Saint-Pierre, de Muskies Canada, de la Fondation de la faune du Québec, du Groupe Thomas marine, de la Fondation héritage faune (Fédération québécoise des chasseurs et pêcheurs) et certains donateurs privés.

Références

De la Chenelière, V., P. Brodeur et M. Mingelbier (2014). Restauration des habitats du lac Saint-Pierre : un prérequis au rétablissement de la perchaude. Le Naturaliste canadien. 138 (2) : 50-61.

Hudon, C., A. Cattaneo, A.-M. Tourville Poirier, P. Brodeur, P. Dumont, Y. Mailhot, Y.-P. Amyot, S.-P. Despatie and Y. De Lafontaine (2012). Oligotrophication from wetland epuration alters the riverine trophic network and carrying capacity for fish. Aquatic Sciences. 74 : 495-511.

Magnan, P., P. Brodeur, É. Paquin, N. Vachon, Y. Paradis, P. Dumont et Y. Mailhot (2017). État du stock de perchaudes du lac Saint-Pierre en 2016. Comité scientifique sur la gestion de la perchaude du lac Saint-Pierre. Chaire de recherche du Canada en écologie des eaux douces, Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières et ministère des Forêts, de la Faune et des Parcs. vii + 34 pages + annexes.

Le maskinongé au Québec : deux siècles d’histoire de pêche et de gestion

Gustave Provost, directeur de la station piscicole de Lachine en 1962. Gustave Prévost, director of the Muskellunge hatchery in 1962. Crédit : MFFP.

Anne Carrier ¹ ², Philippe Brodeur³, Daniel Hatin⁴ et Louis Bernatchez¹
¹Département de biologie, Institut de Biologie Intégrative et des Systèmes (IBIS), Université Laval, G1V 0A6, Québec, Canada
²Département de Techniques du milieu naturel, Centre d’études collégiales à Chibougamau, Cégep de Saint-Félicien, Chibougamau, G8P 2E9, Canada
³Ministère des Forêts, de la Faune et des Parcs, Direction de la gestion de la faune de la Mauricie et du Centre-du-Québec, 100, rue Laviolette, bureau 207, Trois-Rivières, G9A 5S9, Canada
⁴Ministère des Forêts, de la Faune et des Parcs, Direction de la gestion de la faune de l’Estrie-Montréal- Montérégie-Laval, 201, Place Charles-LeMoyne, Longueuil, Québec, J4K 2T5, Canada

Le maskinongé est l’une des espèces de poissons les plus mythiques et impressionnantes. Au cours des deux derniers siècles, les biologistes ainsi que les pêcheurs de maskinongé ont documenté plusieurs aspects fascinants de sa biologie. À titre d’exemples, mentionnons la taille impressionnante qu’atteint cette espèce (Bernatchez et Giroux 2012), ses capacités de déplacement hors du commun (Kerr et Jones 2017) ou encore son comportement parfois surprenant (Crossman 1990, Jennings et coll. 2011). L’histoire entourant le maskinongé est fascinante, comme en témoigne l’origine de son nom et l’historique de sa gestion, qui révèlent l’importance particulière de l’espèce au Québec.

Le présent article a pour objectif de dresser un survol historique non exhaustif de quelques-uns des aspects les plus marquants de la gestion du maskinongé au Québec. On y aborde notamment certaines mentions historiques concernant la nomenclature et la taxonomie du maskinongé, sa répartition spatiale originale et contemporaine ainsi que l’historique des ensemencements. Cette synthèse est issue d’un travail réalisé dans le cadre d’un mémoire de maîtrise, qui visait d’abord à réunir les informations historiques disponibles pouvant soutenir l’interprétation de données génétiques sur le maskinongé dans les eaux québécoises (voir l’article de Rougemont et collaborateurs dans le présent numéro).

Taxonomie et folklore québécois

À l’époque de la colonisation de la Nouvelle-France, des documents d’archives de la Société Provancher mentionnent que le premier vice-roi de France, le Sieur Jean-François de La Rocque de Roberval, utilisait le bassin de la rivière Maskinongé comme territoire de pêche. À l’époque, le maskinongé était une espèce bien connue des populations autochtones, comme en témoignent les multiples racines amérindiennes présumées du nom de l’espèce, qui signifierait gros brochet, brochet laid ou brochet tacheté (Crossman 1986, MacCaughey 1917). Progressivement, ces appellations auraient dérivé pour devenir « masque long » ou « masque allongé » en français québécois. Aujourd’hui, les deux appellations généralement acceptées sont « maskinongé », au Canada, et « Muskellunge », aux États-Unis, mais on répertorie entre 40 et 94 noms communs en français seulement (voir Mellen 1917, Chambers 1923, Weed 1927 et Crossman 1986 pour un inventaire exhaustif des différents noms et de leur origine). Comme le mentionne Crossman (1986), aucun autre poisson n’a probablement autant de versions ou de façon d’orthographier son nom commun dans une seule langue. Selon Weed (1927), la quantité de noms communs d’une espèce reflète généralement l’attrait des gens pour celle-ci. Cela explique en partie cette nomenclature diversifiée et floue, mais comme Mongeau (1976) le souligne, cette confusion d’un point de vue taxonomique vient aussi certainement de sa grande ressemblance avec le grand brochet (Esox lucius) et du fait qu’il a été reconnu assez tardivement comme une espèce différente de son cousin.

Pêche commerciale et répartition naturelle au 19e siècle

Comme la nomenclature de l’espèce a été très variable jusqu’au début du 20e siècle, il est très difficile d’interpréter les observations quant à la répartition du maskinongé avant les années 1900. Au 19e siècle, le maskinongé était une espèce de prédilection pour les pêcheries autochtones et allochtones et, en raison de la qualité de sa chair et de sa taille imposante, il a contribué à une pêcherie commerciale importante au Québec. Bien qu’aujourd’hui les avis soient mitigés à propos du goût de la chair du maskinongé, le naturaliste Constantine Rafinesque mentionnait en 1818 que « c’est l’un des meilleurs poissons (…) sa chair est très délicate et se divise facilement, comme celle du saumon, en grandes plaques blanches comme la neige » (MacCaughey 1917). Selon les registres historiques des autorités de gestion des pêcheries du Canada (Crossman 1986), près de 2,9 millions de livres, représentant approximativement 192 535 maskinongés, ont été récoltées à la pêche commerciale au Québec de 1868 à 1936. Les prises commerciales de maskinongés dans les eaux de la région de Montréal représentaient 90 % des débarquements de cette espèce dans l’ensemble de la province (Fry et coll. 1942). La pêche commerciale du maskinongé a cessé en 1936.

Les textes historiques consultés suggèrent que le maskinongé, à l’état naturel, ne se trouvait que dans le sud du Québec. Sa répartition se limitait vraisemblablement aux eaux du bassin versant du fleuve Saint-Laurent et de certains de ses affluents, de la rivière des Outaouais jusqu’à Québec (Small 1883, Dymond 1939, Vézina 1977). Les limites nord et sud de la répartition de l’espèce ne sont que très peu définies. Selon les informations dont on dispose à ce sujet, à la fin du 19e siècle, on trouvait du maskinongé à l’état naturel, de la frontière sud de la province (incluant le lac Champlain et le bassin versant de la rivière Richelieu) jusqu’au nord-ouest de l’Outaouais, des Laurentides, de Lanaudière et de la Mauricie (Dymond 1939). Plus précisément, Dymond (1939), Small (1883), Halkett (1906 et 1907) et Montpetit (1897) mentionnent que le maskinongé était présent (1) dans la rivière Rideau au nord de Merrickville (Outaouais, Québec), (2) dans la rivière des Outaouais au sud de Rapides des Joachim (MRC de Pontiac, Outaouais, Québec), au sud de la rivière Petawawa et jusqu’au lac Travers (parc provincial Algonquin, Ontario) et (3) dans plusieurs lacs connectés aux rivières Gatineau et du Lièvre, dont les lacs Gilmour, Donaldson et Plumbago (MRC des Collines-de-l’Outaouais, Outaouais, Québec). De plus, quelques populations isolées ont été découvertes en 1968 à la suite du démantèlement des clubs de pêche de la région de la Mauricie, plus précisément dans le bassin de la rivière des Envies, tributaire de la rivière Batiscan, et dont fait partie le lac Traverse (Potvin 1973, Pageau et coll. 1978) analysé dans l’étude génétique de Rougemont et collaborateurs (voir l’article dans le présent numéro). Enfin, selon l’interprétation de Fry et collaborateurs (1942), cité par Robitaille et Cotton (1992), la population naturelle la plus importante au Québec aurait été celle du lac Saint-Louis, un lac fluvial du fleuve Saint-Laurent.

Période de gestion active

Les ensemencements

Gustave Provost, directeur de la station piscicole de Lachine en 1962. Gustave Prévost, director of the Muskellunge hatchery in 1962. Crédit : MFFP.
Gustave Prévost, directeur de la station piscicole de Lachine en 1962.  Photo : MFFP.

Le maskinongé figure parmi les espèces de poissons qui ont été les plus ensemencées au Québec (Dumont 1991). Avant 1950, peu d’ensemencements de maskinongés sur le territoire québécois ont été répertoriés dans la littérature (MacCaughey 1917, Dymond 1939, Small 1883, Halkett 1906 et 1907). À la fin de la première moitié du 20e siècle, une baisse importante des populations de maskinongés dans les eaux du fleuve Saint-Laurent et de l’archipel de Montréal, associée à la surpêche et à la détérioration de ses habitats, a semé beaucoup d’inquiétude. Les autorités de gestion de la faune de l’époque ont alors entrepris un vaste projet de restauration, incluant la construction d’une pisciculture de maskinongés à Lachine (arrondissement de la Ville de Montréal, Québec) (Photos 1 à 3) ainsi que le développement d’une expertise locale d’élevage d’ésocidés (Vézina 1977). En 1950, ces actions ont permis d’entreprendre des ensemencements de soutien. En 1985, ces derniers ont été adaptés aux connaissances contemporaines. Ils se sont ensuite poursuivis jusqu’en 1997. Durant la même période, l’espèce a également été introduite, avec ou sans succès, dans plus de 80 plans d’eau québécois afin de créer de nouvelles opportunités et de mettre en valeur la pêche au maskinongé (Vézina 1977, Dumont 1991, Vincent et Legendre 1974, Brodeur et coll. 2013, de la Fontaine, Y. non publié). Dans quelques rares cas, l’introduction du maskinongé a été utilisée pour tenter de contrôler les espèces compétitrices dans des lacs à omble de fontaine. Ces pratiques d’introduction d’un prédateur de haut niveau dans la chaîne alimentaire ont évidemment eu des répercussions sur les communautés de poissons.

Photo 2 - Station piscicole de Lachine (1950-1964). Photo : MFFP.
Photo 2 – Station piscicole de Lachine (1950-1964). Photo : MFFP.

L’élevage du maskinongé au Québec a débuté à la pisciculture de Lachine, en 1950. En raison de problèmes d’approvisionnement en eau, l’élevage a été transféré en 1964 à la pisciculture de Baldwin Mills, située en Estrie (connue aujourd’hui sous le nom de la station piscicole provinciale de Baldwin-Coaticook) (Dumont 1991). À la suite de quelques tentatives infructueuses visant la reproduction artificielle des maskinongés issus des lacs des Deux-Montagnes (région de Montréal), Gilmour, Donaldson et Plumbago (Outaouais) (MPC 1961, Vézina 1977, Crossman et Goodchild 1978), des œufs embryonnés ont été importés de la pisciculture de Bemus Point (New York, États-Unis) et, dans une moindre mesure, de la pisciculture de Deer Lake (Ontario, Canada) pour amorcer la production (Kerr 2001, Dufour et Paulhus 1977, Christopher Wilson et Christopher Legard, communication personnelle). Les maskinongés élevés dans ces deux stations piscicoles provenaient respectivement du lac Chautauqua (New York, États-Unis) et des lacs Stony et Buckhorn ainsi que de la rivière Crowe, faisant tous partie du système des lacs Kawartha en Ontario. Selon les informations recueillies, il semblerait que tous les lacs utilisés par ces piscicultures aient été ensemencés avec des maskinongés de source inconnue, eux-mêmes élevés en pisciculture, afin de soutenir leur offre de pêche respective (Christopher Wilson et Christopher Legard, communication personnelle). Les deux piscicultures, tout comme celle de Lachine, ne sont plus en activité aujourd’hui.

Photo 3 - Camion de transport de poissons de la pisciculture de Lachine. Photo : MFFP.
Photo 3 – Camion de transport de
poissons de la pisciculture de Lachine.
Photo : MFFP.

De 1965 à 1986, le lac Joseph (Centre-du-Québec, Québec) a été utilisé pour la capture de géniteurs visant à approvisionner la station piscicole de Baldwin Mills (Dumont 1991). Par la suite, de 1986 à 1997, la population du lac Tremblant (Laurentides, Québec) a servi de source. À l’origine, le maskinongé a été introduit dans ces deux lacs à partir des sources américaines ou ontariennes (voir Figure 1, schéma de l’historique des ensemencements connus à ce jour). Les résultats de l’étude génétique ont confirmé que la source américaine est la plus probable.

Les ensemencements de soutien, effectués durant plusieurs décennies dans la région de Montréal, se sont révélés efficaces pour améliorer l’état des stocks et maintenir l’activité de pêche sportive au maskinongé. En effet, une analyse de l’ampleur du recrutement mesuré durant la période de 1962 à 1977 a révélé que 55 % de la variation annuelle de l’abondance des jeunes maskinongés pouvait s’expliquer par le nombre de maskinongés ensemencés au cours de l’année et par l’abondance des jeunes maskinongés de l’année précédente (effet de cannibalisme et/ou de compétition) (Dumont 1991).

L’amélioration de la structure des populations de maskinongés étalée sur une longue période et la présence d’un recrutement naturel ont justifié l’arrêt des ensemencements en 1998 (Cloutier 1987, Dumont 1991). Depuis, aucun ensemencement de maskinongé n’a été effectué au Québec.

Figure 1 - Représentation simplifiée des ensemencements historiques du fleuve Saint-Laurent et de quelques lacs des eaux intérieures du Québec. Les flèches représentent les évènements d’ensemencement à partir de différentes populations sources. Les flèches pleines indiquent des mentions claires d’ensemencement, alors que les flèches pointillées représentent des mentions anecdotiques.
Figure 1 – Représentation simplifiée des ensemencements historiques du fleuve Saint-Laurent et de quelques lacs des eaux intérieures du Québec. Les flèches représentent les évènements d’ensemencement à partir de différentes populations sources. Les flèches pleines indiquent des mentions claires d’ensemencement, alors que les flèches pointillées représentent des mentions anecdotiques.

Intégration de la science collaborative à la gestion du maskinongé

Parallèlement aux mesures de gestion entreprises par le gouvernement, une réflexion sur les pratiques de pêche et un intérêt grandissant pour la conservation d’une pêcherie de qualité axée sur la pêche de spécimens de taille trophée ont émergé, menant à la création de Muskies Canada (Wachelka 2008 a,b,c) et à la naissance d’une longue collaboration entre les pêcheurs et les autorités de gestion de la faune du Québec. Le maskinongé est très peu vulnérable à la capture par les engins de pêche scientifiques utilisés pour le suivi des communautés de poissons. Le suivi de la récolte sportive de maskinongés par l’entremise d’enquêtes de pêche constitue donc une excellente solution pour contribuer à sa gestion et pour permettre l’évaluation de l’efficacité des mesures mises en place.

Pour faire le point sur l’état des stocks de maskinongés, une étude a été menée dans les années 1990 en collaboration avec le chapitre de Montréal de Muskies Canada. De 1994 à 1997, cinq pêcheurs ont étiqueté et relâché 808 maskinongés, principalement dans la région de Montréal. Les résultats ont révélé que quelques heures de pêche suffisaient pour capturer un maskinongé, alors que dans les années 1970, il fallait à un pêcheur sportif expérimenté une centaine d’heures de pêche pour capturer un seul spécimen. Après trois ans de suivi, 88 spécimens ayant été marqués ont été capturés de nouveau par les pêcheurs sportifs, ce qui correspondait à un taux de recapture de 11 %, jugé relativement faible et révélateur d’une abondance totale de maskinongés correspondant à plusieurs milliers de spécimens (Pierre Dumont, communication personnelle). L’augmentation graduelle de l’étendue de la structure en taille suggérée par les résultats des enquêtes de pêche et la présence d’une production naturelle de jeunes maskinongés ont mené à l’abandon des ensemencements en 1998 (Dumont 1991).

La mise à jour des informations sur la récolte sportive de maskinongés dans le fleuve Saint-Laurent (du lac Saint-François au lac Saint-Pierre) et dans le lac des Deux-Montagnes a ensuite été effectuée de 2010 à 2013, soit plus d’une décennie après l’arrêt des ensemencements. Cette seconde phase d’étude a été réalisée grâce à la précieuse collaboration de trois pêcheurs professionnels reconnus au Québec : M. Marc Thorpe, M. Mike Lazarus et M. Michael Phillips.
Au cours de l’étude, un total de 2 569 maskinongés ont été capturés, dont 2 162 ont été marqués au moyen d’une étiquette et 108 de ces poissons ont été recapturés.

L’ordre de grandeur des taux de recapture était faible dans l’ensemble des secteurs étudiés (de 3,7 % à 4,8 %). Par rapport à l’étude réalisée dans la région de Montréal de 1994 à 1997, le taux de recapture documenté dans le même secteur de 2010 à 2013 était deux fois plus faible (4,8 % par rapport à 11 %). Le taux de recapture étant généralement inversement proportionnel à l’abondance totale d’une population, ce résultat suggère que l’abondance du maskinongé dans la région de Montréal aurait augmenté depuis l’arrêt des ensemencements, du moins chez les poissons de taille moyenne à élevée, qui sont ciblés par les pêcheurs.

Figure 2 - Comparaisons historiques de la proportion de poissons de taille supérieure à 44 po dans la récolte sportive au lac Saint-Louis. L’année d’instauration des tailles minimales à 38 po en 1986, augmentée à 44 po en 1998, est également représentée.
Figure 2 – Comparaisons historiques de la proportion de poissons de taille supérieure à 44 po dans la récolte sportive au lac Saint-Louis. L’année d’instauration des tailles minimales à 38 po en 1986, augmentée à 44 po en 1998, est également représentée.

D’après des données archivées de 1918 à 1927, 19 % des maskinongés capturés dans le lac Saint-Louis dépassaient la taille minimale légale de 44 pouces. (Figure 2). En 1973, cette proportion était de 16 % et a ensuite augmenté à près de 50 % à la fin des années 1990 puis à 54 % durant la période de 2010 à 2013. Cette amélioration, échelonnée sur plusieurs décennies, s’explique par les ensemencements de soutien combinés à l’instauration d’une taille minimale légale à 38 pouces en 1986, qui a été augmentée à 44 pouces en 1998 (Figure 2). En raison de la présence de gros spécimens, les eaux du fleuve Saint-Laurent et du lac des Deux-Montagnes sont maintenant identifiées comme site de grand intérêt pour les pêcheurs de maskinongé. Dans le tronçon situé entre Montréal et Sorel ainsi qu’au lac Saint-Pierre, la plus faible abondance de jeunes spécimens de taille inférieure ou égale à 35 pouces récoltés par les pêcheurs sportifs suggère que le recrutement de jeunes maskinongés soit plus faible dans ces deux plans d’eau, comparativement au lac Saint-Louis et au lac des Deux-Montagnes (Figure 3). Ce constat a motivé l’instauration d’une étude par le ministère des Forêts, de la Faune et des Parcs (MFFP) et ses nombreux partenaires dans le but d’identifier les habitats essentiels de l’espèce par télémétrie dans ce tronçon du fleuve (voir l’article de Brodeur et collaborateurs dans le présent numéro).

Figure 3 - Structure en taille des maskinongés dans la récolte sportive mesurée durant la période 2010 à 2013 dans les plans d’eau du fleuve Saint-Laurent (LDM : lac des Deux-Montagnes; LSF : lac Saint-François; LSL : lac Saint-Louis; MS : tronçon entre Montréal et Sorel; LSP : lac Saint-Pierre). La proportion des poissons de taille supérieure ou égale à 44 po, de 36 à 43 po et de 35 po et moins est représentée.
Figure 3 – Structure en taille des maskinongés dans la récolte sportive mesurée durant la période 2010 à 2013 dans les plans d’eau du fleuve Saint-Laurent (LDM : lac des Deux-Montagnes; LSF : lac Saint-François; LSL : lac Saint-Louis; MS : tronçon entre Montréal et Sorel; LSP : lac Saint-Pierre). La proportion des poissons de taille supérieure ou égale à 44 po, de 36 à 43 po et de 35 po et moins est représentée.

La plus récente enquête de pêche a permis d’amasser quelques connaissances préliminaires au sujet des déplacements des maskinongés. Ainsi, entre 2010 et 2013, la majorité des individus recapturés à la pêche sportive (95 %), au cours des six mois suivant le marquage ou un à deux ans après, l’ont été dans le même plan d’eau où ils avaient été marqués. Les distances mesurées entre la capture et la recapture des spécimens étaient généralement inférieures à quelques kilomètres, et ce, autant à l’échelle d’une année qu’entre les années (72,7 % et 58,1 % des recaptures à moins de 5 km du lieu de marquage, respectivement). Bien que les maskinongés puissent se déplacer sur de longues distances notamment en période de reproduction, ce résultat suggère qu’une portion importante des individus est fidèle à des secteurs spécifiques correspondant généralement à de grands herbiers favorables à l’alimentation. Ce résultat démontre l’importance de préserver et de restaurer les secteurs d’herbiers aquatiques du fleuve Saint-Laurent. Des déplacements à large échelle entre les différents secteurs du fleuve ont toutefois été observés entre le lac Saint-Pierre et le tronçon Montréal-Sorel, avec des distances parcourues pouvant atteindre jusqu’à 58 km. Ce constat a récemment été corroboré par les résultats préliminaires de l’étude télémétrique qui montre qu’une certaine proportion des maskinongés marqués au lac Saint-Pierre effectuent des déplacements jusqu’à la région de Montréal (voir l’article de Brodeur et collaborateurs dans le présent numéro). Ces observations de grands déplacements corroborent aussi la connectivité sur l’ensemble du Saint-Laurent révélée par les analyses génétiques.

Perspectives futures

Pour maintenir un statut de poisson trophée, susceptible de maintenir et d’améliorer la qualité de pêche au maskinongé, une révision régulière de l’état des stocks et des modalités de gestion est requise. Depuis 2010, une étude ayant pour objectif général de recueillir de nouvelles connaissances sur plusieurs sphères de la biologie du maskinongé est menée par le MFFP et ses partenaires. Cette étude vise à contribuer à la gestion du maskinongé au Québec. À ce jour, cette initiative a permis de réaliser une rétrospective de gestion historique, faisant l’objet du présent article, une analyse de la génétique des populations de maskinongés (voir l’article de Rougemont et collaborateurs dans le présent numéro), et d’amorcer une étude visant l’identification des habitats essentiels du maskinongé entre Montréal et le lac Saint-Pierre. Certains pêcheurs sportifs rapportent une diminution récente de la qualité de la pêche au maskinongé dans certains plans d’eau des eaux intérieures du Québec, ce qui, par ailleurs, reste à mesurer. Des études sur les populations de maskinongés de la rivière des Outaouais et du lac Maskinongé ont d’ailleurs été amorcées depuis quelques années (voir l’article de Deschesnes dans le présent numéro).

Remerciements

Nous remercions chaleureusement les personnes suivantes pour leur précieuse collaboration: nous tenons à souligner l’implication des pêcheurs de maskinongés qui ont participé à l’enquête de pêche de 2010 à 2013, soit Marc Thorpe, Mike Lazarus et Michael Phillips. Merci tout particulièrement à Peter Levick (Muskies Canada), Chris Wilson (Aquatic Research and Monitoring Section, Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry) et John Farrell (Department of Environmental and Forest Biology, State University of New York) qui nous ont fait part de nombreuses informations sur la gestion du maskinongé. Merci à Christopher Legard (New York State Department of Environmental Conservation) et à Christopher Wilson (Fish Culture Section, Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry) d’avoir vérifié et partagé l’historique des activités des piscicultures du lac Chautauqua et de Deer Lake. Merci à Steven Kerr (biologiste retraité, Fisheries Section, Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources) pour ses précieux conseils et pour avoir partagé son savoir sur l’historique de gestion du maskinongé au Québec. Merci à Shawn Good (Vermont Fish and Wildlife Department) et Jeffrey J. Loukmas (New York State Department of Environmental Conservation) pour avoir partagé l’historique de la gestion et des ensemencements du lac Champlain. Nous remercions également la Fédération québécoise des chasseurs et des pêcheurs, Ressources Aquatiques Québec et Muskies Inc. pour leur soutien financier. Le financement a aussi été assuré par le ministère des Forêts, de la Faune et des Parcs du Québec et par la Chaire de recherche du Canada en génomique et conservation des ressources aquatiques.

Références

Bernatchez, L. et M. Giroux (2012). Les poissons d’eau douce du Québec et leur répartition dans l’est du Canada. 2e éd., Ottawa, Canada.

Brodeur, P., D. Hatin et R. Bacon (2013). Suivi du maskinongé dans le Saint-Laurent et le lac des Deux-Montagnes. Dans: Atelier sur la faune aquatique, 19-21 février 2013, Sainte-Foy, Québec.

Chambers, E.T.D. (1923). The maskinonge: a question of priority in nomenclature. Transactions of the American Fisheries Society (1922) 52: 171-177.

Cloutier, L. (1987). Le maskinongé (Esox masquinongy). Dans : Problématique de la conservation et de la mise en valeur d’espèces de poissons d’eau douce au Québec. Ministère du Loisir, de la Chasse et de la Pêche, Québec.

Crossman, E. J. (1986). The noble muskellunge: a review. In : Managing muskies: a treatise on the biology and propagation of Muskellunge in North America (éd. Gordon HE), p.1-13. American Fisheries Society, Bethesda, Md.

Crossman, E. J. (1990). Reproductive homing in Muskellunge, Esox masquinongy. Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, 47(9): 1803-1812. doi:10.1139/f90-205

Crossman, E. J. and C. D. Goodchild (1978). An annotated bibliography of the muskellunge, Esox masquinongy (Osteichthyes: Salmoniformes).  https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/item/123600#page/3/mode/1up

De la Fontaine, Y. (non publié). Muskellunge stocking in southern Québec waters.

Dufour, M. and P. J. Paulhus (1977). L’élevage et l’ensemencement du maskinongé au Québec. Dans : Compte rendu du 10e atelier sur les poissons d’eau chaude, p. 117-127. Ministère du Loisir, de la Chasse et de la Pêche.

Dumont, P. (1991). Les ensemencements de maskinongé, de truite brune et de truite arc-en-ciel dans les eaux de la plaine de Montréal. Dans : Colloque sur l’ensemencement, p. 30-41. Conseil de l’aquaculture et des pêches.

Dymond, J. R. (1939). The fishes of the Ottawa region [version électronique]. https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/item/111705#page/7/mode/1up

Fry, F., J.-P. Cuerrier et G. Préfontaine (1942). Première croissance du maskinongé dans le lac Saint-Louis en 1941. Dans : Rapport de la Station biologique de Montréal et de la Station biologique du Parc des Laurentides pour l’année 1941, p. 170-175. Fascicule 2, appendice VII, Manuscrit.

Halkett, A. (1906). Report of the Canadian Fisheries Museum. In : 38th Annual report, p. 362-370. Department of marine & fisheries, Fisheries Branch. Appendix number 14.

Halkett, A. (1907). Report of the Canadian Fisheries Museum. In : 40th Annual report, p. 321-349. Department of marine & fisheries, Fisheries Branch. Appendix number 14.

Jennings, M. J., G. R. Hatzenbeler and J. M. Kampa (2011). Spring capture site fidelity of adult muskellunge in inland lakes. North American Journal of Fisheries Management, 31(3): 461-467.

Kerr S. J. and T. A. Lasenby (2001). Esocid stocking: an annotated bibliography and literature review. Fish and Wildlife Branch, Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources. Peterborough, Ontario. 138 p. and appendix.

Kerr J. S. and Jones B. (2017). Movements of Muskellunge in the Saint-John River based on a volunteer tagging project, 2006-2015. American Fisheries Society Symposium, 85: 39-50.

MacCaughey V. (1917). The Chautauqua Mascalonge or Muskalunge. Dans : B. W. Huebsh (dir.), The natural history of Chautauqua (p. 80-83) [En ligne], [https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/item/71239#page/7/mode/1up].

Miller L. M., J. M. Farrell, K. L. Kapuscinski, K. Scribner, B. L. Sloss, K. Turnquist and C. C. Wilson (2017). A review of muskellunge population genetics: implications for management and future research needs. American Fisheries Society Symposium, 85: 385-414.

Ministère des Pêcheries et de la Chasse de la Province de Québec (1961). Contribution de la station piscicole de Lachine à l’étude de maskinongé. Dans : Journal de bord de l’office de biologie.

Mellen, I.M. (1917). Twenty four ways of spelling the name of a fish (muskellunge). New York Zoology Society Bulletin 20, p. 1558.

Montpetit, A.-N. (1897). Le maskinongé. Dans : Les poissons d’eau douce du Canada, p. 76-80, https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/item/45738#page/3/mode/1up

Mongeau, J .R. et G. Massé (1976). Les poissons de la région de Montréal, la pêche sportive et commerciale, les ensemencements, les frayères, la contamination par le mercure et les PCB. Ministère du Loisir de la Chasse et de la Pêche, Service de l’aménagement et de l’exploitation de la faune, Montréal, Québec. Rapport technique no 06-13. xviii + 286 p.

Mongeau, J. R., J. Leclerc et J. Brisebois J. (1980). La répartition géographique des poissons, les ensemencements, la pêche sportive et commerciale, les frayères et la bathymétrie du fleuve Saint-Laurent dans le bassin de Laprairie et les rapides de Lachine. Ministère du Loisir, de la Chasse et de la Pêche, Service de l’aménagement et de l’exploitation de la faune. Rapport technique no 06-29. 145 p.

Pageau, G., Y. Gravel and V. Legendre (1978). Distribution and value of the esocidae in Québec waters. Dans : Compte rendu du 10e atelier sur les poissons d’eau chaude, p. 1-7. Ministère du Loisir de la Chasse et de la Pêche, Direction de la recherche faunique.

Potvin, C. (1973). Inventaire ichtyologique du bassin de la rivière des Envies. Découverte de populations indigènes de maskinongé. Ministère du Loisir de la Chasse et de la Pêche, Direction de la recherche faunique.

Robitaille, J. A. et F. Cotton (1992). Bilan des connaissances sur le maskinongé (Esox masquinongy) et sur ses populations dans le Saint-Laurent. Ministère du Loisir, de la Chasse et de la Pêche, Direction de la gestion des espèces et des habitats. Rapport technique, p. 1-55.

Small, H. B. (1883). Fishes of the Ottawa District. Transactions of the Ottawa Field-Naturalists’ Club (1882-1883), 4: 31-49.

Turnquist, K. N., W. A. Larson, J. M. Farrell, P. A. Hanchin, K .L., Kapuscinski, L. M. Miller, K. T. Scribner, C .C., Wilson and B. L. Sloss (2017). Genetic structure of muskellunge in the Great Lakes region and the effects of supplementation on genetic integrity of wild populations. Journal of Great Lakes Research, 43(6): 1141-1152. doi:10.1016/j.jglr.2017.09.005

Vézina, R. (1977). Les introductions de maskinongé, Esox masquinongy, au Québec et leurs résultats. Dans : Compte rendu du 10e atelier sur les poissons d’eau chaude, p. 129-135. Ministère du Tourisme, de la Chasse et de la Pêche du Québec, Service de l’aménagement de la faune.

Vincent, B. et V. Legendre (1974). Répartition géographique du maskinongé, Esox maskinongy, dans le district des Laurentides. Compilation 1972. District de Montréal, Service de l’aménagement de la faune et Service de la recherche biologique. Ministère du Tourisme, de la Chasse et de la Pêche du Québec, Service de l’aménagement de la faune. Rapport technique.

Wachelka, H. (2008a). Muskies Canada, the first 10 Years. Muskies Canada Release Journal, mai/juin, p. 11.

Wachelka, H. (2008b). Muskies Canada, the Middle Years. Muskies Canada Release Journal, juillet/août, p. 11.

Wachelka, H. (2008c). Muskies Canada, 1999 to Present. Muskies Canada Release Journal, septembre/octobre, p. 8-10.

Weed, A. C. (1927). Pike pickered and muskalonge, Zoology leaflet 9. In: D. C. Davies (dir.), Field museum of natural history Chicago, p. 152-205, https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/item/25559#page/75/mode/1up

Rideau River Muskie Study

Read/download the full thesis  by clicking the link below (PDF – 552 KB)
Comparative spatial ecology of sympatric adult muskellunge and northern pike during a one-year period in an urban reach of the Rideau River, Canada

Abstract: The reach of the Rideau River that flows through Ottawa, Ontario supports a recreational fishery for northern pike (Esox lucius) and muskellunge (Esox masquinongy). The reach is unique not only because such a vibrant esocid-based recreational fishery exists in an urban center, but that these two species co-occur.

Typically, when these species occur sympatrically, northern pike tend to exclude muskellunge. To ensure the persistence of these esocid populations and the fisheries they support it is important to identify key spawning, nursery, foraging and over-wintering locations along this reach, and to evaluate the extent to
which adults of the two species exhibit spatio-temporal overlap in habitat use. Radio-telemetry was used to track adult northern pike (N = 18; length 510 to 890 mm) and adult muskellunge (N = 15; length 695 to 1200 mm) on 73 occasions over one year, with particular focus on the breeding seasons (early April until the end of May [56% tracking effort]). For the two esocids, we observed 19–60 % overlap in key aggregation areas during each season and during the spawning period. The  minimum activity (average linear river distance travelled between consecutive tracking events) and core range (linear river distance within 95 % C.I. of mean river position) were greatest in the winter and fall for northern pike and in the spring for muskellunge. On average, northern pike were considerably smaller than muskellunge and had lower minimum activities and smaller core ranges, which
could be a result of thermal biology, limited suitable habitat, prey availability or predation. Results from this study will inform future management of these unique
esocid populations and should be considered before any habitat alterations occurs within or adjacent to the Rideau River.

 

Feeding Habits and Diet of the Muskellunge (Esox masquinongy): a Review of Potential Impacts on Resident Biota

January 2016 – Report prepared by Steven J. Kerr for Muskies Canada Inc. and Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry

Executive Summary

The Muskellunge (Esox masquinongy) is known as a voracious apex predator.  In instances where muskellunge are extending their range, either through intentional or inadvertent introduction and natural range extension, concerns have been identified about the potential negative impacts on resident fishes and aquatic biota.  This review has been conducted to assemble information on muskellunge predatory habits and diet as well as interspecific competition with other species.

Muskellunge prey on a wide variety of organisms but prefer other fishes.  Predation is based largely on whatever species in available at the preferred size.  There is a considerable amount of evidence to indicate that Muskellunge prefer soft-rayed fishes and the availability of soft-rayed prey cound determine the degree of predation on other species.

Generally, there a few definitive studies to quantify impacts (if any) of Muskellunge on other fish species.  There is very little evidence to indicate that Muskellunge have a significant negative impact on populations of other popular sport fish species including Walleye, Largemouth Bass and Smallmouth Bass.  In fact, there are numerous instances where these fish species successfully co-habit the same waterbody.  Since Muskellunge seldom occupy coldwater habitats, their interactions with coldwater fishes (i.e. salmonids and coregonids) are poorly understood.  This is an area which requires future study.

Potential negative impacts of Muskellunge on other fish species are probably related to the size of waterbody and the composition of the resident fish community.  Larger waterbodies and those waters having a diverse forage fish community seem to be relatively unaffected by the presence of Muskellunge.  The presence/abundance of soft-rayed fish species likely reduces the predation on other resident fish species.

Other fish species can have negative impacts on the Muskellunge.  Northern Pike are known to have a competitive advantage over Muskellunge where they coexist.  Young Muskellunge are also subject to predation by other fishes including Largemouth Bass, Yellow Perch, Rock Bass and Walleye.

Based on this literature review several recommendations are offered.  These are related to initiating more quantified studies to document impacts (if any) when Muskellunge are introduced or become established in new waters, utilizing  new state-of-the-art techniques to determine diets and predatory-prey relationships amongst a broader range of fish community types (including salmonids and species at risk), and developing efforts to improve the public perception of Muskellunge.

The full report is available by clicking the link below.

Feeding Habits and Diet of Muskellunge (Final)